Faculty Activities and Publications | September 2016

Clinical Professor Allison Bethel

  • She provided comments to the Chicago Reader on the impact of ending the Chicago Housing Authority’s Exemption Payment Standards.

Professor Samuel Jones 

  • He taught a judicial education course titled Internet, Electronic and Digital Evidence in Criminal Trials to a class of approximately 90 judges.

Professor Ann Lousin

  • She provided comments to the Chicago Tribune regarding possible solutions to the Illinois pension problem.
  • She provided comments to the Associated Press regarding same-day voter registration laws.
  • She provided comments to the Chicago Tribune regarding Blago.

Professor Hugh Mundy

  • He provided comments to WBEZ regarding statute of limitations.
  • He provided comments to the Chicago Sun-Times regarding the mental competency of an accused terrorist.
  • He provided comments to WBEZ regarding restrictions on sex offenders.

Assistant Professor Mary Nagel

  • She provided comments to the Chicago Sun-Times regarding the release of police misconduct files.
  • She provided comments to Law.com regarding the ABA paid externship debate.

Professor Timothy O’Neill

  • He published the following columns in the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin:
    • 7th Circuit stretches Jardines beyond single-family house
    • Posner opinion aims to put teeth into ‘reasonable suspicion’ doctrine
    • What would high court Justice Aristotle say if Utah v. Strieff came up?
    • Fourth Amendment’s reasonableness standard a work in progress?
    • Jury system: Constitution’s invisible fourth branch of government

Professor Steven Schwinn

  • He was interviewed on Bloomberg radio regarding a U.S. Supreme Court case involving the Fourth Amendment.

Professor David Sorkin

  • He provided comments to WGN regarding cyber bullying and social media.

 

Adjunct Faculty

Raymond McKoski

  • He presented and served as a panelist at the Savanna Law School Colloquium on American Legal Fictions. His presentation was entitled “The Overarching Legal Fiction: Justice Must Satisfy the Appearance of Justice.”
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